Quick, Hide the Bride!

"If you wed in bleak November, only joys will come, remember. When December snows fall fast, marry and true love will last."

It's common knowledge that it's bad luck for the groom to see his bride on the wedding day before the ceremony, as far as wedding customs go. Marriages were frequently arranged a long time ago, a deal between the bride's parents and the groom's used to gain alliances, more power, or greater wealth. Until the ceremony, local wedding customs prevented the bride and groom from meeting in person. To prevent the groom from leaving once he saw her (if she was, in fact, unattractive), he was not allowed to speak with her until after the ceremony was finished.

Wedding customs also required that the bride was also required to wear a heavy, thick veil (just in case) and it was only lifted after the ceremony. And, at that point, the groom could no longer back out from his commitment. Many modern brides still incorporate these two wedding traditions; it, of course, lends to the excitement of the day, keeping her groom anxious to see how beautiful she looks when she walks down the aisle.

And Other Wedding Traditions, Customs, and Oddities Still in Practice

There are literally hundreds of other wedding traditions, customs, and superstitions that make up today's marriage ceremony, and some are quite odd. In certain areas, kissing and/or running into a chimney sweep, dove, or black cat is good luck while sewing your own wedding dress is bad (for every stitch, you'll shed a tear). Regardless of which wedding customs you incorporate into your special day - from the old to the new - the origins of each are steeped in history, and though they've morphed, they still equate to the celebration of love in many diverse ways.